Hull based producer Steve Cobby’s prolific career stretches back to the early 90s when his duo Fila Brazilia began releasing records. Since then, Cobby has released music under various monikers, as well as remixing and collaborating with a number of high-profile artists. His latest project saw him soundtrack a production by Ensemble 52, which is now available as a nine track record and shares

Hull based producer Steve Cobby’s prolific career stretches back to the early 90s when his duo Fila Brazilia began releasing records. Since then, Cobby has released music under various monikers, as well as remixing and collaborating with a number of high-profile artists. His latest project saw him soundtrack a production by Ensemble 52, which is now available as a nine track record and shares it’s name with the play.

Cobby is best known as a producer of downtempo electronica, so it’s a surprise when opening track “Revolution #1” opens with the menacing thrum of an overdriven guitar accompanied by a pacey acoustic drum beat. At the one minute mark, brassy synths cut through the rock instrumentation however, evoking the space rock of Spiritualized and hinting at the predominantly electronic nature of the record to come.

According to writer Dave Windass, Revolutions is a play which draws parallels between the turbulent political climate of the late 1980s and today. “Revolution #2” certainly calls up the spirit of that time with it’s crisp drum machines and stabbing piano chords which combine for a fashionably retro house vibe. Track three sees another stylistic turn, with electronic and acoustic elements melding seamlessly to produce a lush 90s chillout sound.

“Revolution #5” makes heavy use of kitsch lounge keyboards, presumably purposive in the context of the play but when considered in it’s own right the track strays slightly too close to realm of elevator music. Thankfully, track six takes the record into slightly more revolutionary territory with it’s aggressively digital synth bass and industrial sounding percussion. “Revolution #7” continues in a similar direction creating a bleak retro-futurist urban soundscape with weird percussive pattering and washes of eerie synth chords creating an awesome air of tension…..READ THE REVIEW IN FULL VIA OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE BELOW

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