This Sunday, Hull’s forefront electronic music event déjà vu bring the curtain down on 24 years of bringing the cities clubbers together. It was in 1992 when promoter Terry Spamer quit his job as a caravan manufacturing operative to pursue a living putting on parties and bringing premier league Dj’s to Hull from across the globe. The event is the UK’s second longest running house night, only a few months behind the institutional beast of back2basics in Leeds.

Deja Vu @ El Divino, Ibiza 2005

Deja Vu @ El Divino, Ibiza 2005

 

 

You’ve been putting on house music events for 24 years across Hull, the UK, and Ibiza. What is your advice for such longevity?

The key is working hard and moving with the times. respect the past, but embrace the future.

 

Who was the first booking for deja vu and where was the event held?

We first launched called Reach at Tower with Sasha, Dave Seaman, Allister whitehead and Marshall. We branded the year after and renamed it Deja vu. This time, the lineup was Masters at Work, Judge Jules, John Kelly both at Tower

 

Ironically, you hold the 24th Anniversary event in the same venue, now called Funktion. What’s the difference in crowds and atmosphere from back then to today’s’ house music culture?

Well, we still have a handful of the originals who still come, but it’s the second generation now. Not a lot has changed apart from the haircuts and fashions. I suppose music wise it Felt a lot fresher and new. We all knew that we were at the beginning of something special, which has obviously lasted the test of time.

11281692_407474469432212_997528209_n

Although deja vu has had a resurgence of late, what were the prime years for you?

We’ve had several phases where we’ve had a lot of success. The mid-90s were, big, we wound sell out Room every Friday. We then had to move to The 1500 capacity Eclipse every Saturday. We launched in. Boxing Day and 3000 turned up. The Fez days from 2000 were also big and attracted 1000-1500 every week. Then if course we had 6 amazing years at the Welly from 2003

As a promoter of deja vu, you now combine physical and digital mediums of getting the word out. Tell us, what is a typical day for you when you are in promotion mode?

Each day can be different, but typically, I would do my emails when I get up about 6.30, maybe do a quick post on Facebook. Do the school run and then I would start the distribution of posters and flyers, go home do a bit on social media, then hit the takeaways on the evening. It’s a full-time job for me.

327657_2458702555331_1273571064_o

13091578_10153337601411841_1836463009_o (1)

 

Finally, what track would you say defines a deja vu party?

Sorry, I can’t answer that. far too many Deja vu classics, one thing I will say is that 99% of records at classic house nights now were first played at Deja vu. This is not a dig at anyone or a brag, just a fact. We’ve had a lot of very influential weekly residencies at the Room, Eclipse, Rhythm Room, Fez Club and the Welly which enabled our DJs to break and create some fantastic anthems. We were lucky enough to be sent a lot of test pressings/promos from some of house music’s finest labels. We would also book a lot of big producers who would give us records before they were in the shops. This Is why I loved the vinyl era because It gave us that edge because we would be the only club in Hull you hear certain at the time.

 

24 Years of dèjá vu @ Funktion, this Sunday 11pm-5am – EVENT DETAILS

12909619_10154702531933625_7494670710875550648_o